Privacy Policy Statement

Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

This policy was last modified on May 23, 2018

This policy covers both the comic site found at http://www.bbe-tech.com” and the store found at http://beesmart.bbe-tech.com. We also partner with Patreon for our subscriptions.. All of these partners have thorough privacy policies and do not resell the data you enter there. It is our intention to be fully GDPR compliant. Our servers and sites are primarily located outside the EU.

If you wish to remove your data from our site or our partners, please refer to the paragraph on opting out below or contact Tony Sandoval, DBA BBE-Tech and Bee Smart beekeeping project for individual assistance.

What information do we collect?

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  • Like many websites, we use “cookies” to enhance your experience and gather information about visitors and visits to our websites. Please refer to the “Do we use ‘cookies’?” section below for information about cookies and how we use them.

How do we use your information?

We may use the information we collect from you when you register, purchase products, enter a contest or promotion, respond to a survey or marketing communication, surf the website, or use certain other site features in the following ways:

  • To personalize your site experience and to allow us to deliver the type of content and product offerings in which you are most interested.
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  • If you have opted-in to receive our e-mail newsletter, we may send you periodic e-mails.

If you would no longer like to receive promotional e-mail from us, please refer to the “How can you opt-out, remove or modify information you have provided to us?” section below. If you have not opted-in to receive e-mail newsletters, you will not receive these e-mails. Visitors who register or participate in other site features such as marketing programs and ‘members-only’ content will be given a choice whether they would like to be on our e-mail list and receive e-mail communications from us.

For the membership or account portions of our site, we retain your data until you cancel your membership at which point it will be deleted. Or until your account has been inactive for longer than two years.

If you have specific questions or concerns about our use of your personal data, please email bigbear@bbe-tech.com We will be happy to identify exactly what data we have and to adjust our use of it as you wish.

How do we protect visitor information?

Your personal information is contained behind secured networks and is only accessible by a limited number of persons who have special access rights to such systems, and are required to keep the information confidential. When you place orders or access your personal information, we offer the use of a secure server. All sensitive/credit information you supply is transmitted via Secure Socket Layer (SSL) technology and then encrypted into our databases to be only accessed as stated above.

We only retain data as long as necessary to provide the services for which you provided the data.

Do we use “cookies”?

Yes. Cookies are small files that a site or its service provider transfers to your computer’s hard drive through your Web browser (if you allow) that enables the site’s or service provider’s systems to recognize your browser and capture and remember certain information. For instance, we use cookies to help us remember and process the items in your shopping cart. They are also used to help us understand your preferences based on previous or current site activity, which enables us to provide you with improved services. We also use cookies to help us compile aggregate data about site traffic and site interaction so that we can offer better site experiences and tools in the future.

We may contract with third-party service providers to assist us in better understanding our site visitors. These service providers are not permitted to use the information collected on our behalf except to help us conduct and improve our business.

You can choose to have your computer warn you each time a cookie is being sent, or you can choose to turn off all cookies. You do this through your browser (like Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer) settings. Each browser is a little different, so look at your browser Help menu to learn the correct way to modify your cookies. If you turn cookies off, you won’t have access to many features that make your site experience more efficient and some of our services will not function properly.

Do we disclose the information we collect to outside parties?

We do not sell, trade, or otherwise transfer to outside parties your personally identifiable information unless we provide you with advance notice and obtain your permission, except as described below. The term “outside parties” does not include Tony Sandoval DBA BBE-Tech and the Bee Smart beekeeping project. It also does not include website hosting partners and other parties who assist us in operating our website, conducting our business, or servicing you, so long as those parties agree to keep this information confidential. We may also release your information when we believe release is necessary to comply with the law, enforce our site policies, or protect ours or others’ rights, property, or safety.

Non-personally identifiable visitor information, like aggregated statistical data, may be provided to other parties for marketing, advertising, or other uses.

How can you opt-out, remove or modify information you have provided to us?

To modify your e-mail subscriptions, you can use the unsubscribe link at the bottom of any email we send. Please note that due to email production schedules you may receive any emails already in production.

To opt out of Patreon,  or one of our future partners, go to that site and use their account cancellation procedures.

To opt out of membership on beesmart.bbe-tech.com please let us know by modifying your preferences in the “My Account” section.

To delete all of your shopping account information from our store database, sign into the “My Account” section of shop.schlockmercenary.com and remove your shipping addresses, billing addresses & payment information. Please note that we may maintain information about an individual sales transaction in order to service that transaction and for record keeping.

For assistance with any of these opt out choices, you may email bigbear@bbe-tech.com we will happily assist you in erasing any data you no longer wish us to have.

Alternately you may communicate via paper mail by sending a letter to:

Tony Sandoval DBA BBE-Tech & Bee Smart beekeeping project
2738 Madison St

Omaha, BE 68107

Your rights

If you reside in certain territories, including the EU, you have a number of rights in relation to your personal information. While some of these rights apply generally, certain rights apply only in certain limited cases. I describe these rights below:

  • Access. You may have the right to access and receive a copy of the personal information I hold about you by contacting us at bigbear@bbe-tech.com.
  • Change, restrict, delete. You may also have rights to change, restrict my use of, or delete your personal information. Absent exceptional circumstances (like where I am required to store data for legal reasons) We will generally delete your personal information upon request.
  • Object. You can object to (i) my processing of some of your information based on my legitimate interests and (ii) receiving marketing messages from me after providing your express consent to receive them. In such cases, We will delete your personal information unless we have compelling and legitimate grounds to continue using that information or if it is needed for legal reasons.
  • Complain. If you reside in the EU and wish to raise a concern about our use of your information (and without prejudice to any other rights you may have), you have the right to do so with your local data protection authority.

Third party links

In an attempt to provide you with increased value, we may include third party links on our site. These linked sites have separate and independent privacy policies. We therefore have no responsibility or liability for the content and activities of these linked sites. Nonetheless, we seek to protect the integrity of our site and welcome any feedback about these linked sites (including if a specific link does not work).

Changes to our policy

If we decide to change our privacy policy, we will post those changes on this page. Policy changes will apply only to information collected after the date of the change. We will maintain a listing of when the policy is updated at the beginning of the policy.

Questions and feedback

We welcome your questions, comments, and concerns about privacy. Please send us any and all feedback pertaining to privacy, or any other issue to bbe-tech.com

Online Policy Only

This online privacy policy applies only to information collected through our website and not to information collected offline.

Your consent

By using our site, you consent to our privacy policy.

A New Bee Smart Bee Spotters Feature

With the kick-off of the new Bee Spotters classes being offered at Lauritzen Gardens with yours truly as the instructor, and tying it all together with the Bee Spotters section on the Bee Smart beekeeping project forum page here, I now bring to you “I.D. That Bee.”

As an ongoing feature, there will be native bee online “baseball cards” to help future Bee Smart Bee Spotters better identity what species of bee they found.

What’s even better is that in the future, there will come along games and contests to “collect” certain Genus or species of bees in general or at specified locations.

So, come back regularly and come back often to see the new “I.D. That Bee” posts that can help you collect bees and win prizes.

The Book Everyone Who Loves Bees Should Have

I have been working with bees professionally for about 8 years now.  I am involved in education, conservation, training and “infotainment” all having to do with keeping bees healthy and thriving.

I talk to countless numbers of people who tell me they love bees and want to help bees but don’t want to be a beekeeper, what can they do?

You can do any one or all of these three things but if you’re only absolutely only going to do one of them, do the one that helps bees directly first.

The three things?

Buy local honey from local beekeepers.  That honey money is often the only thing that allows them to keep at what they do.  You’re not just getting awesome honey, you are helping beekeepers keep bees alive and healthy.

Become a Patreon patron of my Bee Smart beekeeping project at my Patreon page” p.  You are getting beehind the scenes access to information and activities while helping ensure that we can rescue local bees instead of them being exterminated. You are helping to make sure I can continue to do more and improve on the podcasts, videos and live presentations about bees, beekeeping and bee conservation.

Buy the book, “The Bees in Your Backyard: A Guide to North America’s Bees” by Joseph Wilson and Olivia Messinger Carril.  Read it.  Use it.

This book does much more than just show you multiple types of bees and how to identify them.  It shows you how to make your yard an attractive habitat and a safe place for bees.

 If you only do one of these things, BUY THIS BOOK!

Then do the other two things anyway.

Paint Tips For Beekeepers

Beekeepers often tend to be crafty, handy people.  Sometimes it’s due to being frugal, other times because we like to do things ourselves.  One of the things beekeeper’s often find ourselves doing is paint.

We paint hive parts.  We paint hive stands. We paint sheds and honey houses and all kinds of related to beekeeping things.

It’s interesting how often I get asked, especially by those who also know me as a handyman, how to go about painting.  So I offer you some basic tips that might answer some other people’s painting questions.

For example, types of paint and primer.  Nowadays you’ll mostly find paint with primer already mixed in.  It’s nice and can help somewhat reduce how much paint is bought and used.  The big questions have to do with what kind of paint to get.

First of all, use exterior paints.  They are made to withstand the elements and give outside things longer life with better durability.

So, do you use oil based or latex paints?  Here are some basic rules of thumb;

In regard to oil-based paint;

  1. Use on bare wood (especially, but not limited to: Redwood, Cedar, and Pine)
  2. Use on metal, like doors, cover tops,  etc…(But not galvanized metal)
  3. Over previously painted or even stained surfaces
  4. Also on hardboard siding.  (If it was primed at the factory, still a good idea)

Most beekeepers use Pine and sometimes Cedar.  Using an oil based primer/paint is better for wood hive parts, hive stands, etc…

What about Latex?

There are used for an exterior latex paints for beekeepers as well.

  1. Concrete and masonry surfaces.
  2. Aluminum or vinyl siding, etc.. (like on an out-building, etc…)
  3. Stucco or brick surfaces.
  4. Exterior grade Plywood
  5. Galvanized metal
  6. Surfaces that were originally stained then painted on.

Beelieve it or not, The next most common painting related questions are about what to use to paint with.

When it comes to brushes and rollers, it comes out a lot smoother and a better finish if you use natural fibre bristle brushes or roller covers with oil-based paints.

Latex paint is a little more forgiving and you turn out just fine, maybe better in some cases, if you use nylon or polyester bristle brushes with latex paints.

Brush or Roller?

As with general painting, brushes are better for closer, specific, or detailed work.  I recommend brushes for hive parts and hive stands.

For out-buildings, sheds, etc…  rollers cover a lot more area better.

I hope this helps at least somewhat.  I know beekeepers tend to go with the lowest price a lot.  But if you trying to come out with a specific result or quality, maybe these tips can bee useful.

If you’d like to support the Bee Smart beekeeping project to continue providing articles like this, podcast episodes, and videos, please consider signing up at the Bee Smart beekeeping project Patreon page.

So you want to be a beekeeper but…

As a beekeeping class instructor and trainer of beekeeping skills at the teaching apiaries I manage, one conversation I have a LOT is, “I want to be a beekeeper but…”  and then one of a list of reasons or excuses preventing them from doing so.

I say both reasons and excuses because there are some valid reasons why some is finding it difficult or improbable to keep bees on their own.  However, there are some things that come up that really are just excuses that can be overcome more easily if the effort is expended.

My answer to those folks that want to be beekeepers but… is don’t “just” be a beekeeper, be a Beehooligan instead.

Advantages if being a Beehooligan are:

  • You don’t need to have your own place to keep bees, you can play with the bees in the teaching apiaries.
  • You can have experienced mentors right there with you whenever you are unsure or have questions.
  • You get to build experience in multiple methods of beekeeping and to participate in a variety of bee related activities.
  • You can be an active advocate of bees, beekeeping and bee conservation to non-beekeepers by participating in public access presentations and events.
  • You can be a member of a small group of deranged maniacs who thoroughly enjoy playing with flying, stinging insects and they get you as much as you get them.
  • Even if you want to start beekeeping in the middle of the year and no bees are available to buy, you still can trade your time for building active experience and camaraderie so you are better prepared for the next season to start.
  • I work to build in extra perks to make your time invested worthwhile besides the beekeeping experience and education.  Things like Beehooligan only events and special deals and “leftovers”.
  • You get to be part of the podcast episodes, videos and presentations where our ever growing fans are waiting to see and hear from the Beehooligans.

When you’re a Beehooligan, your setting yourself up for success and fun in a shared apicultural experience with a bunch of other folks who can’t think straight without bees in their life (or sometimes at all, but mad luv for all Beehooligans just because we have to bee a little nuts).

I have set up and continue to set up more teaching apiaries that double as bee rescue relocation destinations.  This means as I go rescue and relocate live honey bee and bumblebee colonies with my Beehooligans, I have more places for Beehooligans to get to play with bees by helping me with the apiaries.

So, if you are around the Omaha metro area and want the biggest, bestest beekeeping experience around, then contact Tony Sandoval at one of the teaching apiary days or by calling or texting 402-370-8018.

Honey Bee Bashing Needs To Stop Yesterday

There seems to be a slight trend building in response to the problems facing bees that is actually working against the overall goal of improving conditions and health of bees everywhere.

The news that honey bees were facing a mysterious mortal crisis really hit it’s stride back in the early 2,000’s.  Colony Collapse Disorder was a thing on the mainstream media and the world began to pay attention to the situation facing honey bees.

With all of the attention focused sharply and intently on honey bees, enthusiasts of more than just Apis mellifera began to get perturbed that other types of bees were feeling the heat of environmental calamities but not getting their own 15 minutes of fame.  So these focused fans began to work harder to bring the details of environmental crisis to native bees to light.

It started well enough, the #beetoo movement.  We saw that bumblebees like the Rusty Patch bumblebee was placed onto the Endangered Species list soon followed by another bumblebee species in Hawaii. Grim tidings to bee sure.

Yet, it doesn’t seem enough to some people to get some attention.  To these more radical few, it’s not good enough until you have ALL of the attention.  So began the ramp up in rhetoric to make honey bees not only less-victims, but perhaps even villains.

They make the point that honey bees aren’t native to North America and that as occupational immigrants, they aren’t deserving of prioritizing related to research and protection.

They say that honey bees aren’t as effective pollinators as most native bee species.  Which is true.  What is also true is that honey bees are efficient, partly due to their ability to focus on a flower crop and not be very likely to stop focusing on say, alfalfa, to just hop over to some thistle or other flower type.  Honey bees stay focused on a flower type until they have worked all of those flowers in the area before focusing on a different nectar source.  This makes them more desirable to farmers working to maximize an entire crop.

These hyper-fans also tell us that many native bees make more efficient use of bee population numbers to accomplish more.  For example, fewer Mason bees can pollinate more area than a much larger population of honey bees.

This is also true.  However, by and large, honey bees are THE champs at being able to be managed by people in large numbers and transported to a variety of crops over a larger part if the growing season.  Many native bees are simply not manageable or as available over the same period.

“Only” seven species of honey bees are around to produce honey out of the more than 24,000 plus species of bees in the world.  Native bees outnumber honey bees.  Yet again, true.  Honey though, is a highly sought commodity.  It brings millions, if not billions of dollars into the market beyond pollination services.

My point is this…We do not need to throw honey bees under the bus in order to see awareness for native bees increase and improve.  As a matter of fact, honey bees help bring more awareness to the overall conditions and situation of all bees.

I love all bees.  I teach about honey bees and provide beekeeping hands-on training.  I also teach classes about native bee identification, and conservation.  I am providing not just classes but a creative, interactive way to get more people actively looking for native bees bees and improving habitat and environmental conditions for them.

Being divisive about bees and throwing the spotlight species under the bus only serves to lessen overall bee conservation efforts, not improve them.  We can increase positive awareness for honey bees and native bees alike at the same time and appreciate what each species brings to the table.

That’s what the Bee Smart beekeeping project is working toward.

Beekeeping is Therapeutic, Keep Calm and Keep Bees

One of the biggest reasons I am so enthusiastic about collaborating with Scatter Joy Acres and Joy Bartling is because of the opportunity to have a place that spotlights bees and beekeeping on multiple fronts.  It not only provides space but an open-minded and willing support for bee conservation, skills training, providing a “safe space” for people to encounter bees in a positive way, and to facilitate the incredibly therapeutic experience that beekeeping offers.

Beekeeping can be a very relaxing and calming experience.  It requires the beekeeper to proceed in a purposefully calm and deliberate manner.  There sensory experiences that beekeepers enjoy have been often described as soothing, relaxing, and contributing to an almost Zen-like state of mind.  Like I said earlier, it can be downright therapeutic.

Joy and the volunteers at Scatter Joy Acres bring rescued animals to the ranch and then introduce people seeking calming and self-fulfilling therapeutic experiences to those animals.  This does two things at once.  It provides the rescued animals with and abundance of care and positive interaction from people and it gives people an opportunity to build confidence, a sense of purpose and calm to build up the inner strength to live more full and positive lives.

Bringing rescued bee colonies to SJA helps to keep bees that might have otherwise been exterminated or died of unnecessary environmental stress factors alive and in a low stress environment.  It also allows the Bee Smart beekeeping project to introduce people to the fascinating and often stress relieving experience of beekeeping.

I welcome anyone who is seeking out unconventional and interesting ways to help to alleviate stress issues such as people recovering from ptsd, over-busy lives, incarceration, low self esteem and other such stressful backgrounds.

With the new teaching apiary at Scatter Joy Acres being a home for rescued bees, maybe it could bee a good fit for you to.

Contact Tony Sandoval here at the Bee Smart beekeeping project to find out more about how bee rescue and beekeeping might bee just the the therapeutic experience that you are looking for.

You can support the Bee Smart beekeeping project and it’s efforts in bee conservation, beekeeper skills training, and building informative and entertaining public awareness about bees at the Bee Smart beekeeping project Patreon page.

 

The First Step To Rescuing Local Bees Is

Hi, my name is Tony Sandoval, AKA, “Big Bear” and I run the Bee Smart beekeeping project.  It’s all about bee conservation, beekeeper hands-on experience and increasing public information.

The local bee conservation is a big part of the whole thing.  Can’t train beekeepers or give the public unique learning experiences without bees.

Every year, there are calls made by home owners, property management companies and others to have bees, usually honey bees or bumblebees, gotten rid of.  Only some of those removed actually don’t need to be moved, they’re not in a place to hurt anyone, the people just aren’t wanting to tolerate them.

Still others have chosen inconvenient nest locations that result in unfortunate interactions that might be public safety or health issues. Such as when they move into the wall or roof of a house or building.  They might have chosen a ground nest location where there is a lot of human and animal traffic.

Most of these unfortunate situations are resolved by extermination.  What’s really sad is they don’t have to be exterminated.  They can usually be removed and relocated alive.

Why don’t people choose relocation more often?  Cost is one factor.  It’s actually a pest management issue.  The Bees have moved into a location that puts them at odds with people thus being considered pests.

When most people think of “pest management”  they think of extermination first.  However, pest management is more than extermination.  It’s prevention, it’s relocation, it’s release.  Extermination is usually the last resort if there is no immediate, mortal threat.  Yet it’s usually the first choice by people who don’t want the bees there.

Bee rescue begins with public education and is quickly followed by people choosing live removal instead of extermination.  Bee rescue starts before I get a phone call.  You have to want to keep the bees alive.

In Nebraska, by law, any bee removal from a building, any building, includes complete removal of the nest.  Most pest control companies are great at killing bees but rarely, if ever, remove the nest.  They’re supposed to, but they don’t.  It’s easier to apply a pesticide and let them die where they are.

In a live removal though, the entire nest is removed.  When I do a live removal, not only is the nest removed, the space is treated to prevent attracting new critters and filled to prevent re-inhabitation.  To top it off, I consult the contractor on how to properly seal the repair so it isn’t an entry point again.

Most people have no idea how poorly their houses and buildings are sealed to allow pest entry.  Modern, rushed, construction methods and old, settling buildings have hundreds of entrance points for small things to get in.

I work with contractors and bring apprentice beekeepers to get the bees, remove the nest, leave the nest site better than it was before and take the bees somewhere they can have unharmed and productive lives.

You have to make the decision to call me instead of an exterminator before any of that can happen though.  Which, when you do call me, makes you the hero.  You made the important decision, I’m just carrying it out.

Bee a hero, choose bee conservation instead of extermination.  The bees you save could be pollinators to the local farmer market produce you eat.  They could be the producer of the next jar of honey you buy.  They could be the inspiration and teacher of the next generation of beekeepers.

You can make that possible.  Bee a hero and choose live removal.

You can get a free inspection by calling me at 402-370-8018.  Ask for Tony.  We’ll come to an arrangement where every one wins, the bees, you, and the community that needs them.

 

 

Great News For The Beehooligans Podcast

Finally…FINALLY!!!

The long, bad times are over.  We have finally figured out the solution for the long distance connections to record podcast episodes with some of our favorite Beehooligans like JP, Schawee, Yappy and Debbie.

We’ll also be able to get some guests back on that we had been planning to invite before the great disaster.

Ideally, what I’d like to do is a twice per month release, with one episode including our remote Beehooligans as they are able and the second episode of the month with our local Beehooligans talking about our escapades around the Omaha area.

Look for hearing some of our more remote and ornery Beehooligans in May.

Great New Items For Bee Smart Bee Spotters Is Coming

The Bee Smart beekeeping project is proud to announce that some very cool items are coming this Summer to help our Bee Spotters ID more bees and look good doing it.

Don’t forget to register on the Bee Smart beekeeping project website Forums page for free to share you bee hunting adventures with photos and details about each bee you spot.

Bee Spotting season is here!