Building Bee Approved Bait Hives

According to certain notable bee researchers and authors, there IS a way to build bait hives that are more likely to be a preferred destination for wayward honey bee swarms.

In a co-authored Cornell Extension publication (#187), “Bait Hives for Honey Bees” back in 1989, ROger Morse, Tom Seeley and Richard Nowogrodzki gave us some valuable tips to capturing those wayward swarms in ait hives to put them into our own apiaries.

The twelve recommendations to build a better bee bait hive are:

  1. Height: about 15 feet (5 meters) above the ground.

  2. Shade and Visibility: well-shaded, but ighly visible.  Bees avoid or abandon bait hives in direct sun.

  3. Distance from parent nest: not important.

  4. Total entrance area: about 1.5 to 2 sq inches (10 to 15 cm²); a circular opening about 1 ¼ inch (3.2 cm) in diameter is suggested.

  5. Entrance shape: Not important

  6. Entrance position: near the floor of the hive.

  7. Entrance direction: facing south preferred, but other directions are acceptable.

  8. Cavity volume: about 1.4 cubic feet (40 liters) This is about the volume of one standard ten-frame Langstroth hive body.

  9. Cavity shape: not important.

  10. Dryness and airtightness: dry and snug, especially at the top.

  11. Type of wood: Various types acceptable; many types of trees have been occupied. Bees may avoid new lumber.

  12. Odor: the odor of beeswax is attractive. However, putting in pieces of comb is not advisable, as comb aso attracts wax moths and can harbordisease organisms.  If a hive body is used as a bait hve, agood solution is to insert a few wired fames, each containing a strip of foundation. Commercially available chemical lures that smell like lemon grass and apparently miic the scouts’ communication scents work well and can be used in bait hives of any shape.

Bee Smart Crosswords #7: The Honey Puzzle

Hello fellow melliphiles, you might have noticed that last week, the week of Thanksgiving, we didn’t have a puzzle for you, that is to bee expected as we are always trying to meet the demands of bees, family and business.

Have no fear though!  We have a fun and tasty new puzzle for you all about honey.  In tune with this week’s theme of  honey here on the Bee Smart beekeeping project website AND the podcast featuring C. Marina Marchese co-author of “Honey Connoisseur” (with Kim Flottum).

Of course, you can print out this Crossword, as always using the link to the PF below and yes, it has a word list to help you folks who aren’t into the beekeeping lingo yet.

 

Genomic study explores evolution of gentle ‘killer bees’ in Puerto Rico

How cool is it when science and nature complement each other.

Love it when science happens.  Honey bee genetics, biology, physiology.  Especially when science shows us that natural adaptation happens.

Take a look at this journal article about the “Gentle” africanized bees that have been selected for in a specific and limited geographic area.

Source: Genomic study explores evolution of gentle ‘killer bees’ in Puerto Rico

Bee Smart Crossword #7-Notable Beekeeper Researchers

Here we again.  We have a short list of some notable people involved over the years in honey bee research.

You can work the puzzle online here or you can print out the PDF below which also includes a wordlist for those unfamiliar with apicultural terms.

Bee Smart Crossword #7_ Notable Beekeeping Researchers

As always, you can get the answer sheet for the puzzle over at the Bee Smart Patreon page.  We would love to have your support to keep our efforts moving forward.

Notable and Notorious Beekeepers

The topic for the Bee Smart beekeeping project website this week is learning a bit more about the notable and notorious beekeepers that have moved the world of beekeeping over the years.

Some have given us great innovations in methods and equipment.  Others have increased our understanding immensely.  Still others have given us experience in what not to do rather than do what they actually did.

Let’s chat about some if the great minds and personalities that have helped modern apiculture become what it is today, shall we?

Honey Lovers Club @ Mangelsen’s

Do you love Honey?  Have you thought of yourself as a honey connoisseur or would like to be?  Terrific !

Come join us at the new Honey Lovers Club @ Mangelsen’s in Omaha, NE on Saturday afternoon, November 25th from 1 to 2 pm.

We will sample various honey, talk about how to identify honey and beegin the journey to appreciate honey in all it’s culinary potential together.

Hosted by Tony “Big Bear” Sandoval of BBE-Tech Apiary Services and the Bee Smart beekeeping project.

Please register at the Mangelsen’s website to beegin this journey of honey appreciation with us.

 

The Bee Smart Topic for the week of 11-06-2017

Hey there folks.  We are still trying to maintain a certain focus on the things we post on here at the Bee Smart beekeeping project on a weekly basis.

This week, we’re going to pay a bit more attention to bees and pesticides.  Both the Crossword and Wordsearch puzzles are based on this topic and Big Bear will be doing a video doing a mini “class” on the subject as well.

Hop on over to the website forums and share your ideas and experiences having to do with bees and pesticides in your little piece of the world.  We’d love to see you there.